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1954-1971 Civil Rights Era
John F. Kennedy, September 30, 1960, to L. Y. Ballentine.

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John F. Kennedy, September 30, 1960, to L. Y. Ballentine.

Form letter from Senator Kennedy to precinct workers, thanking them for their support during the 1960 election. L. Y. Ballentine was the North Carolina Commissioner of Agriculture.

 

Lyndon B. Johnson, The White House, March 13, 1966, Governor Dan K. Moore.


Lyndon B. Johnson, The White House, March 13, 1966, Governor Dan K. Moore.

In this letter, President Johnson expresses appreciation for Moore's attendance at a White House governors' conference on Vietnam where a Resolution of Support was passed indicating the nation's unity and its commitment to peace. The war in Vietnam was an overriding factor in Lyndon Johnson's presidency and he was unsuccessful in his efforts achieve a settlement to the conflict during his administration . Controversy over the war became a crisis by the end of March 1969, when Johnson limited the bombing of North Vietnam in order to initiate negotiations. At the same time, he withdrew as a candidate for re-election so that he might work towards peace unimpeded by politics.

 

Richard M. Nixon, The White House, February 2, 1971, to Governor Robert W. Scott.


Richard M. Nixon, The White House, February 2, 1971, to Governor Robert W. Scott.

President Nixon encloses with this letter a copy of his State of the Union address of January 22, 1971 and emphasizes to Governor Scott his commitment to "strengthening of government at the state and local level." Nixon acknowledges that a point of debate on this issue is "the extent to which the American people can be trusted to govern themselves," but he says, "I believe they can be trusted." A break-in at the offices of the Democratic National Committee during the 1972 campaign entangled Nixon in the "Watergate " scandal in his second administration. The break-in was traced to officials of the Republican Committee to Re-elect the President. A number of officials in the Nixon administration resigned, and some were later convicted of offenses connected with efforts to cover up the affair. The president denied any personal involvement, but the courts forced him to yield tape recordings which indicated that he had, in fact, tried to divert the investigation. Faced with almost certain impeachment, Nixon resigned the presidency on August 9, 1974.

Last Modified: 11/10/2010

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