baner image

Home   Browse Complete Collection  

1900-1929 North Carolina’s Industrial Revolution and World War One

 

Click on the image of any document that you want to see a larger version of or read in its entirety (where available).

North Carolina Constitutional Reader, Being a Hand Book for Primary Use in One Part

This scarce African-American imprint by G. Ellis Harris, a principal of a school in Littleton, entitled North Carolina Constitutional Reader, Being a hand Book for Primary Use in One Part (Raleigh: Printing Office, St. Augustine's School, 1903). The volume was designed to overcome the burden placed on African-American voters by the provisions of the Permanent Registration Act of 1901 (the "Grandfather Clause") by enabling them to read and construe any part of the Constitution with which they might be confronted with by poll officials. This is an important piece of evidence in how African-Americans responded to the Act.

 

Autographed speech by President Theodore Roosevelt on October 19, 1905 during a visit to Raleigh


Autographed speech, printed on 30 cards, delivered by President Theodore Roosevelt on October 19, 1905 during a visit to Raleigh.

President Roosevelt visited Raleigh and spoke to a crowd of thousands at the State Fair. His speech dealt with a variety of subjects including railroad regulation and forest preservation. Roosevelt signed the last card of the speech at the request of J. Bryan Grimes, Secretary of State of North Carolina.

 

William Howard Taft, Appointment of Henry G. Conner to United District Judge


William Howard Taft, Appointment of Henry G. Conner to United District Judge, 1909

Appointment of Henry G. Conner to United District Judge for the Eastern District of North Carolina, signed by President William Taft.

 

William Howard Taft, New Haven, June 13, 1913, to Walter Clark, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Raleigh.


 William Howard Taft, New Haven, June 13, 1913, to Walter Clark, Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, Raleigh.

After serving as president, Taft became a professor of constitutional law at Yale University and in this letter thanks Justice Clark for sending him two of Clark’s addresses "Defects of the Constitution of the United States" and the "Legal Status of Women in North Carolina". Taft later achieved his lifelong aspiration when he was appointed by Warren Harding as chief justice of the Supreme Court in 1921.

 

 

Photograph of William Howard Taft.


Photograph of William Howard Taft.

 

Woodrow Wilson, to Edward W. Pou, House of Representative, Washington.


Woodrow Wilson, The White House, Washington, May 14, 1917, to Edward W. Pou, House of Representative, Washington.

Edward William Pou of Johnston County was elected to Congress in 1900 and served 16 terms. From 1911 to 1934 he served on the powerful House Rules Committee, acting as its chairman 1917-1921. In this letter to Pou, President Wilson gives hearty support to a proposed Committee on Woman Suffrage in the House of Representatives. Wilson "think[s] it would be a very wise act of public policy, and also an act of fairness to the best women who are engaged in the cause of woman suffrage."

 

Warren G. Harding, to Edward W. Pou, September 16 1922


Warren G. Harding, The White House, Washington, September 16 1922, to Edward W. Pou.

Harding thanks Pou for recommending that Mrs. Harding drink a certain medicinal water to improve her health and expresses appreciation for Pou's interest. Florence Kling Harding suffered from chronic kidney disease and died on November 21, 1924, a little more than two years after the date of this letter.

 

Letter from Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. to Fred A. Olds


Letter from Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. Acting Secretary of the Navy, to Fred A. Olds, Director of the Hall of History, The North Carolina Historical Commission, July 25, 1922.

A letter from Theodore Roosevelt, Jr. to Fred A. Olds, to inform him that the silver service from the RALEIGH is in storage at the Navy Yard, Charleston, S.C. Roosevelt informs Fred A. Olds that the service can be lent to the State of North Carolina, but must be subject to recall by the Navy at any time. Roosevelt gives detailed instruction on the proper steps that must be taken in order for the service to be sent to North Carolina.

Calvin Coolidge, The White House, October 2, 1923, to Governor Cameron Morrison.

 

Calvin Coolidge, The White House, October 2, 1923, to Governor Cameron Morrison.

President Coolidge invites Governor Morrison to lunch at the White House on October 20 to discuss enforcement of narcotic, immigration, and prohibition laws.

Last Modified: 02/23/2011

home