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1820-1860 Antebellum

 

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Martin Van Buren, July 26, 1830, to Nathaniel Macon.

Van Buren, Secretary of State in the Jackson administration in 1830, informs Macon that he is sending a letter of Macon's which is supportive of the Jackson administration to the Richmond Enquirer for possible publication. In a later letter to Van Buren, Macon expresses displeasure at what he considered the impropriety of the public disclosure of a personal letter and states that Van Buren's act "has not diminished my friendly feelings toward you, though it may have diminished my confidence."

 

 

James Madison, Montpellier, July 15, 1831, to Governor Montfort Stokes


James Madison, Montpellier, July 15, 1831, to Governor Montfort Stokes

Madison informs Stokes that he is sending his personal copy of John Lawson's The History of Carolina to replace the one destroyed by the fire in the State House.

The prized Lawson volume which was burned in the June 21, 1831 fire which destroyed the State House had been purchased for the State Library at the November 20, 1821 estate sale of Robert Williams of Raleigh for $65. The copy donated by Madison remains today as part of the collection of the State Library of North Carolina.

 

James K. Polk, Washington, April 29, 1846, to D. S. L. Swain, President of the University of North Carolina.


James K. Polk, Washington, April 29, 1846, to D. S. L. Swain, President of the University of North Carolina.

President Polk, a native of Mecklenburg County and an 1818 graduate of the University of North Carolina, declines Swain's invitation to stay at Swain's home in Chapel Hill when Polk speaks at the upcoming commencement. Polk feels it would be better for him to stay at a "public house" because of the crowds at such occasions.

 

Autographed engraving of Zachary Taylor by J. Sartain from a sketch made by Captain Eaton, aide-de-camp, Camargo, Mexico, August 15, 1846.


Autographed engraving of Zachary Taylor by J. Sartain from a sketch made by Captain Eaton, aide-de-camp, Camargo, Mexico, August 15, 1846.

 

The Cherokee Physician


The Cherokee Physician, or Indian Guide to Health, as given by Richard Forman, a Cherokee Doctor; Comprising a Brief View of Anatomy, with General Rules for Preserving Health Without the Use of Medicines. The Diseases of the U. States, With Their Symptoms, Causes, and Means of Prevention, are Treated on in a Satisfactory Manner. It also Contains a Description of a Variety of Herbs and Roots, Many of Which are not Explained in any Other Book, and Their Medical Virtues Have Hitherto Been Unknown to Whites; to Which is Added a Short Dispensatory by James W. Mahoney

As the title implies, The Cherokee Physician... was published to be a practical guide to medical remedies. The book is broken up into three different sections: part one is on the human anatomy and general rules of illness prevention; part two contains descriptions of different diseases and their treatments; and part three has a list of botanical remedies used by the Cherokee.

This second edition copy was published in Asheville, North Carolina in 1849 by Edney & Dedman. The book is a small octavo, bound in its original brown calf skin.

A copy of this book has also been transcribed and is available at Documenting the American South, an initiative sponsored by the University Library at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill.

 

 

Millard Fillmore, Washington, July 22, 1850, to William A. Graham.


Millard Fillmore, Washington, July 22, 1850, to William A. Graham.

President Fillmore informs William A. Graham of his appointment and confirmation by the Senate as Secretary of the Navy. Graham of Lincoln County served as governor of North Carolina from 1845 to 1849 and was secretary of the navy from 1850 to1852.

 

Commission, January 10, 1855, of William D. Pender as second lieutenant in the Second Regiment of Artillery, United States Army, signed by President Franklin Pierce and Secretary of War Jefferson Davis.


Commission, January 10, 1855, of William D. Pender as second lieutenant in the Second Regiment of Artillery, United States Army, signed by President Franklin Pierce and Secretary of War Jefferson Davis.

William Dorsey Pender of Edgecombe County resigned his commission in the United States Army prior to the outbreak of the Civil War and offered his services to the Confederacy. In May of 1863 he was promoted to major general at the age of twenty-nine, but was severely wounded in the leg on the second day of the battle of Gettysburg and died after the amputation of his shattered leg. Pender is buried in the yard of Calvary Episcopal Church in Tarboro.

 

James Buchanan, May 21, 1859, Washington, to Lawrence O'Bryan Branch.


James Buchanan, May 21, 1859, Washington, to Lawrence O'Bryan Branch.

President Buchanan discusses his upcoming visit to Chapel Hill to speak at the University of North Carolina commencement, and expresses his " warm regard for the people of North Carolina." Branch, a native of Halifax County, represented North Carolina in the U. S. House of Representatives from 1855 to 1861 where he was a staunch supporter of Buchanan.

Last Modified: 07/11/2011

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